10 thoughts on “Contact”

  1. Is there an option to sign up for a newsletter? or join?
    I would be happy to support this initiative where possible.
    This is the most logical solution for our Country.

    1. Thanks for your support; it is much appreciated.

      We had thought of a newsletter some time ago but didn’t progress with it due to other commitments, but we should really produce one from now as there is quite a bit going on at the moment. Please contact me at info@bene.ie to receive the first one we produce.

      Denis.

  2. I am in total agreement with BENE aims.
    It is important to coalesce as strength lies in numbers. We have to remove fear and ignorance.
    Aimed information is vital.
    Informed experts on communication are more important than technical brilliance.
    We need a plan to communicate to people who are biased, fearful, suspicious.
    T0 understand this message requires mental energy. So it must be short and simple.

    Are you having any get togethers ? John Stack C Eng. FIE

    1. I couldn’t agree more, John!

      We’re at the start of such communication effort and it is a challenge, to say the least! Would you know of anyone who could help us in this regard? No problem if no name springs to mind! We think we have a good, simple message prepared after much work but need help in spreading the word.

      Regarding get togethers: I’m addressing a group in TCD on Thursday evening if that is of interest.

      Then, we’re holding a small public outreach event (Stand Up For Nuclear) on College Green (we think!) on Sunday afternoon October 20th at which a good few of will be there.

      And there is a potentially very interesting evening being planned for Clonmel for Weds October 23rd if sufficient numbers are confirmed.

      Do any of these suit you? You can contact me at the info at bene.ie address to correspond on this if you like.

      Thank you for getting in touch,

      Denis.

  3. Hi,

    How do we get around the fact that nuclear fission is prohibited in Ireland by the Electricity Regulation Act of 1999? This seems to be the first hurdle in creating a reactor in Ireland.

    Also how viable do you think Thorium MSR type reactor technology is?

    Thanks,

    Darren

    1. Hi Darren,

      The ban is a classic chicken and egg situation: There will be little interest in rescinding the ban unless there is seen to be a need to do so, but they won’t see the need until they look at nuclear which they won’t do because it is banned.

      So, you’re right – drop the ban and then leave it up to planning, economics, social reaction, environmental protection, etc to determine whether a plant gets built. But it would be a prerequisite to have broad political support for a nuclear programme as it would not do to have a new government impose new requirements on a nuclear plant owner or even to scrap the deal completely.

      Which means also that a public body (either a new state body or an existing Semi-State such as ESB, Bord Gais, etc) should own the asset.

      Molten Salt Reactors are making satisfactory progress in various countries but are still a bit further away than we would like. Thorium is even further behind Uranium salt reactors, but it would be great if they become viable and commercial.

      Meantime, I tend to stay away from ‘picking a winner’ on the technology front but concentrate on reactors that either suit Ireland now (Westinghouse AP1000 with a dedicated interconnection capacity, or possibly a CANDU) or are likely to appear before 2030 (NuScale SMR or the Chinese HTMR / ‘Pebble Bed’ or even the Moltex Stable Salt Reactor).

      You can contact me by email if you’d like to follow up any of these options offline, if you like.

      Thanks,

      Denis.

  4. Is now the time to move on this?

    Could this be part of the economic stimulus needed to restore our economy after COVID-19?

    Are we now ready to listen to the warnings of the scientific community?

    We can’t go back in time to respond to COVID-19 more effectively. We won’t be able to go back in time to prevent climate change either. Lets deal with it now while we still have a chance!

  5. Love the website. Just writing to show my support.

    Feel free to email me in future and I will support any way I can.

    In an interview with Rolls-Royce, they said that national policies that support nuclear power are a vital factor that is needed in order to get R&D projects funded or approval at board level.

    Our aim should be get government to include nuclear as part of its energy policy.

    The interview was on the Titans of nuclear podcast episode 298-Alan Woods

  6. I do not believe that renewables alone can guarantee a reliable source of electricity to replace our use of fossil fuels. The only clear way to eliminate CO2 emissions using current technology, given the increased demand that charging cars and heating homes will create, is to include nuclear power in the mix. It’s either that or face a future of energy poverty, particularly during wintertime, when solar assets will produce less than half what they can in summer and winds may be still for days on end.
    John

    1. Thank you, John. We agree, and believe that there is sufficient room for doubt about our current energy policy that we should remove the bans that prevent the State from having a proper look at what nuclear can do for us. Many government departments say they are not looking at nuclear located in Ireland because it is against the law to locate them here.

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